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The history of the belt

The history of belts dates to the Bronze Age, a period in prehistory that lasted from around 2100 BC to 750 BC. Both men and women wore belts, made of a piece of leather, and intended to keep the clothing around the waist in place. They were simply fastened with a button, very different from the metal buckles that belts are equipped with nowadays.

From 1850, the belt was no longer worn by men and women, only during certain periods. In the "Wild West", for example, the belt was more common for men, while women usually wore dresses and did not need a belt. In the early Middle Ages, the late 17th century and between 1900 and 1910, belts were also a fashion accessory for women. The Art Nouveau women's belts from the beginning of the nineteenth century have even become real collector's items nowadays.

Historie Belts painting

In wartime, especially in the late 19th century up until the First World War, the belt was reserved to be worn as a decorative part of the military uniform. These tight belts served to narrow the waist and give men a physically strong appearance. Wearing a tight belt emphasizes a broad chest and shoulder area. Sometimes a corset was worn under the uniform to make the waist look even narrower. 

In the 'modern era', belts started to be worn in the 1920s. Before 1920, belts had a service function. They were associated with the military. Nowadays, it is common to wear a belt on every pair of trousers. Since the mid-1990s, wearing belts has been especially popular among young people. The trousers were worn very low on the hip, often still showing the top of the pants. This "urban" style, which can be traced back to prisoners (eventually, wearing belts in prison was banned because they were used as weapons and means of suicide), remained popular into the 21st century. Especially among young people.

So, now you're all up to date. High time to check out our collection of men's belts.

Image on the left: Marshal Saint Arnaud (1801-1854). French soldier and Marshal of France. The history of belts dates to the Bronze Age, a period in prehistory that lasted from around 2100 BC to 750 BC. Both men and women wore belts, made of a piece of leather, and intended to keep the clothing around the waist in place. They were simply fastened with a button, very different from the metal buckles that belts are equipped with nowadays.

From 1850, the belt was no longer worn by men and women, only during certain periods. In the "Wild West", for example, the belt was more common for men, while women usually wore dresses and did not need a belt. In the early Middle Ages, the late 17th century and between 1900 and 1910, belts were also a fashion accessory for women. The Art Nouveau women's belts from the beginning of the nineteenth century have even become real collector's items nowadays.

Soldier belt

In wartime, especially in the late 19th century up until the First World War, the belt was reserved to be worn as a decorative part of the military uniform. These tight belts served to narrow the waist and give men a physically strong appearance. Wearing a tight belt emphasizes a broad chest and shoulder area. Sometimes a corset was worn under the uniform to make the waist look even narrower. 

In the 'modern era', belts started to be worn in the 1920s. Before 1920, belts had a service function. They were associated with the military. Nowadays, it is common to wear a belt on every pair of trousers. Since the mid-1990s, wearing belts has been especially popular among young people. The trousers were worn very low on the hip, often still showing the top of the pants. This "urban" style, which can be traced back to prisoners (eventually, wearing belts in prison was banned because they were used as weapons and means of suicide), remained popular into the 21st century. Especially among young people.

So, now you're all up to date. High time to check out our collection of men's belts.

 

Very happy with my tie. The colour and quality of it is excellent. Delivery was good too.
Alex
I’m very happy with my order, excellent quality and fast delivery.
George Federico
Prompt and courteous replies when asking for information regarding an order. The brown braces feel of high quality and look very smart. Looking forward to wearing them.
Tim
I\'m absolutely happy with my tie. The photos on the website showed exactly what I got. High quality product, good customer service. Thank you.
Janos
Nice, good quality tie, delivered promptly. Perfect for the posh party I was going to.
Keith Ellis
Excellent quality, great value for money & super service. Item arrived promptly & well packaged.
Very pleased.
Johnnie Bell-Kelman

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